New Physiotherapy and Pilates Clinic

Please forgive this non clinical blog.

After 3 years in our old clinic and 6 months of telling everybody we were moving, we at JUMP Physiotherapy have finally moved to a bigger space. No new maps are needed, no change of address required and no new telephone number. We are still situated in the same building on the same floor just in the office next door.

Why have we moved? When you see our new bigger clinic it’ll all become obvious. We  now have available a separate Pilates studio, Physiotherapy clinic and Sports Therapy room. The new Pilates studio means we’ve been able to offer more Pilates classes (see our class timetable) as well as add to our Pilates large equipment. We now have a Pilates reformer and tower of power, a Combo chair as well as a Pilates Arc on top of all our small equipment. The Pilates studio also doubles as a Rehabilitation area for our Physiotherapy clients. So we now have an even bigger gym area for post surgery rehabilitation and physiotherapy.

We hope to be able to announce shortly a Sports Therapist and Masseuse joining our team who’ll be available for regular weekly appointments. Kieran O’ Donovan continues as our clinic’s Lead Physiotherapist, Naomi Gill continues as our Womens’ Health Physiotherapist and Andy Bond continues as our Pilates Instructor as normal. To coincide moving to a bigger Physiotherapy clinic we also launched our new website recently (JUMP Physio). Please let us know what you think. You can now follow us on Twitter @jumpphysio and @jumppilates . For those of you who don’t tweet.. we now have a newsletter you can subscribe to. Our monthly newsletter will contain updates on any new classes, special offers (yes they will be special) as well as providing, tips from our  Pilates, Physiotherapy and Sports Therapy teams. We don’t send spam or use existing e-mail addresses to contact you about changes and offers at our clinic so this will be our way of letting you decide how much information you’d like from us.

 

Of course all of these changes are done to enhance the experience of everyone attending JUMP Physio whether it is for Physiotherapy, Pilates or Sports Therapy so please let us know what you think of the space and of your experience here. Suggestions on how to improve are always taken on board.

 

JUMP Physio

 

 

Stress Fracture of the Tibia.

Although stress fractures of the tibia are a pretty rare occurence in the running population, we’ve seen two in our sports injury clinic in the last month. The causative factors in both cases were similar and caused by a combination of tight calves and insufficient recovery periods between runs. Rather than an in depth look at the causative factors and treatment of shin splints this is short post on the questions asked by our two clients in the last few days
1) Can I run with a stress fracture

No, No. No. Absolutely not, if it still hurts stop running. There is no option b.
2) How do I know if I have a stress fracture?

Clients often have pain on walking which intensifies and worsens on running with a local area of tenderness on the front of the shin. Clinically it can be diagnosed with the help of a thorough subjective history and with pain on direct or indirect percusion over the area. Although the first line of investigation is often the x-ray, it tends to be picked up earlier with both an MRI scan or a bone scan and sometimes a combination of two scans will be used to confirm the diagnosis.

3) What causes the stress fracture? -

Stress fractures can can occur in elite runners as easily in novice weekend plodders. They are thought to be the long term consequence of overloading the tissues on the anterior shin. As mentioned in a previous post  one of the the long term effects of training is bone thickening or the osteoblastic formation of new bone. Before this happens however in the short term the tissues fatigue leading to osteoclastic re absorption of bone resulting in a weaker bone. A stress fracture occurs when the weakening phase outstrips the strengthening phase and is the long term result of overloading your tissues when you run. This can be due to direct pressure on the tibia (shin) or indirect pressure through the tissues that attach onto the shin bone. A number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors are thought to contribute to the over load injury including things as varied as  duration, frequency and intensity of exercise, shoe wear,decreased flexibility, changes in muscle strength leg length discrepancies, age and sex.

4) What do I do? Rest the injured area and address any mechanical issues with a health care professional such a Physiotherapist. Assessment and prevention of recurrence may include a gait analysis, biomechaical analysis as well as a re-think of how you train. In consultation with your Physiotherapist or coach try to maintain cardio vascular fitness without directly loading your tibia or surrounding muscles.

What are overuse injuries?

With the London marathon and Manchester 10km now begining to loom on the horizon we have seen the  familiar increase in overuse type injuries  here at JUMP Physio. These have been especially in but not limited to to the running population. The inevitable question always arises. What causes over use injuries? Well, without stating the obvious it is usually a combination of factors such as the training load, the biomechanics of the movement and physiological state of the tissue.   Needless to say here at JUMP Physio we don’t see athletes with excellent biomechanics, normal tissue and subjected to appropriate training load  presenting themselves in the clinic. We do however see a whole bunch of frustrated people of all abilities presenting with one or more of the above  contributory factors. Such as the runner who has gradually being building up their mileage with appropriate recovery periods, developing shin splints, anterior knee pain, achilles tendinopathy or ITB problems due to altered mechanics caused by tight calves or weak glutes.  We also see people with optimal mechanics, present with similar injuries because of inappropriate loading or lack of recovery between runs.

Every time you exercise your tissues are loaded causing physiological change and structural adaptation. In running or with any other  training stimulus this can lead to muscle hypertrophy, thickening of bones, enhancement of neural pathway’s, the strengthening of tendons. These changes take time however and before all these positive adaptations occur the short term effects of training are that tissues fatigue and become less resilient to load. Continuing to apply load to these tissues increases the risks  associated with tissue break down and injury.

Management of these injuries therefore focuses on addressing the relevant biomechanical faults, identifyng the state of the underlying tissue and prescribing a suitable load and recovery plan. Of course it also helps if you understand what has caused the injury so it doesn’t happen again.

The run at Clearwater

If you feel like you may have over done the training or can’t figure out why your body hurts so much after an easy run give us a call at JUMP Physio to see if we can help.